Editie 40 passie voor kwaliteit



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Editie 40

passie voor kwaliteit

15 mei 2008







Hierbij ontvangt u de Eurofins Info Nieuwsbrief: een selectie uit het voedselveiligheids- en wetgevingsnieuws van de afgelopen week:




VOEDSELVEILIGHEID & -KWALITEIT

1. FOOD : Beijing promises safe food for Olympic athletes and audiences

2. ETIKETTERING : Ruim helft voedingsetiketten klopt niet

3. FOOD : EFSA publishes EU-wide survey on Salmonella levels in turkeys

4. PESTICIDE: New Zealand; Chemicals 200% above limit found in produce

5. EU RAPID ALERT SYSTEM : Meldingen voedingsmiddelen door/uit Nederland - Week 19

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VOEDSELVEILIGHEID & -KWALITEIT



1. FOOD : Beijing promises safe food for Olympic athletes and audiences


The capital is able to guarantee food safety for athletes and audiences during the Olympics, a city official said here on Thursday.
"Beijing has established a comprehensive food safety control mechanism that covers the whole process, from production to the table, to make sure Olympics food is entirely safe," Ma Lin, director of the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission, told a press conference.
Ma said the city has established 25 local food safety standards since 2002 and has chosen nine farms in greater Beijing as designated sources of major food products, such as meat and vegetables, for the Games.
Olympic food produced in other cities and provinces is inspected under the same strict standards, he said. A food tracing system is also in place for the transfer of food products destined for the Olympics, according to Ma.
The system involves bar codes as 'identity cards' for vegetables and livestock, according to earlier reports. The bar codes could enable food safety authorities and the public to get information about the production area and date, producer, brand and source of seeds by scanning bar codes in a supermarket or via phones, the Internet and text messages. "We had a trial of the food produce tracing system in the 2007 Special Olympics World Summer Games held in Shanghai. It was a success," Ma said.
In addition, China published its new draft food safety law, which lays out penalties from fines to life in prison for makers of substandard food, for public comment as its latest initiative to ensure food safety. According to the draft, producers of substandard food products would face fines, the confiscation of their incomes and revocation of production certificates. In serious cases, they could face prison terms ranging from three years to life.

Bron: news.xinhuanet.com, nieuwsbericht 9 mei 2008 `index






2. ETIKETTERING : Ruim helft voedingsetiketten klopt niet


WELLINGTON - Ruim de helft van de etiketten op voeding die is verrijkt met vitamines en mineralen, bevat fouten. Dat blijkt uit een onderzoek van de Nieuw-Zeelandse wetenschapper Barbara Thomson. Zij onderzocht drie jaar lang 160 verschillende producten als babyvoeding, muesli en fruitdrankjes voor de Voedsel en Waren Autoriteit. Uit haar onderzoek blijkt dat 58 procent van de etiketten niet klopt. Van de foutieve etiketten bevatte 15 procent minder voedingsstoffen dan vermeld en 42,5 procent bevatte meer voedingstoffen dan vermeld. Sommige producten bevatten vijf keer zoveel voedingsstoffen als het etiket vermeldde.
Bron: www.distrifood.nl, nieuwsbericht 13 mei 2008 `index

3. FOOD : EFSA publishes EU-wide survey on Salmonella levels in turkeys


The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has published a survey on Salmonella levels detected on commercial turkey farms across the European Union in 2006-2007. The full range of Salmonella types were estimated on average to be present in almost one third of turkey flocks reared for human consumption (30.7%) and in 13.6% of turkey flocks kept for breeding purposes, according to an EU-wide report from an EFSA Task Force[1]. Amongst the full range of Salmonella types, Salmonella Enteritidisand Salmonella Typhimurium (the two Salmonella types responsible for the majority of Salmonella-related food infections in humans) were detected in 3.8% of flocks reared for human consumption and in 1.7% of breeding flocks. Salmonella was the second most reported cause of food-borne diseases in humans in Europe with 160,649 people suffering from Salmonella infections in 2006[2] (approximately 35 people in every 100,000).
These results will now help the European Commission in setting targets[3] to reduce Salmonella Enteritidisand Salmonella Typhimurium in turkey flocks across the EU. The EFSA Task Force is also recommending action at national level to reduce other serious types of Salmonella which often cause human infections.
Levels for the full range of Salmonella types detected in turkey flocks varied quite significantly between Member States[4]. Three Member States reported no cases at all in flocks reared for human consumption, while others detected levels as high as 78.5%. In the case of breeding flocks, more than half of the countries also reported no cases at all in their flocks, while others detected levels as high as 82.9%. In addition to Salmonella Enteritidisand Salmonella Typhimurium, the two Salmonella types responsible for the majority of Salmonella-infections in humans, some countries also reported high levels of other types of Salmonella.
Although there was a lower level of Salmonella in breeding flocks compared to flocks reared for consumption, Salmonella-infected chicks from breeding flocks which are sold to turkey-rearing farms for consumption can spread Salmonella amongst these flocks.
Salmonella is the second most reported cause of food-borne diseases in humans in Europe. Infections can range from a mild to severe gastroenteritis and in some vulnerable groups, such as children and the elderly can be fatal. Risks for consumers are from under-cooking of turkey meat or cross-contamination to other foods. Thorough cooking and strict kitchen hygiene will prevent or reduce the risk posed by Salmonella contaminated turkey meat.
In the future, EFSA will also publish a series of other baseline surveys[5] on Salmonella and Campylobacter which are carried out based on sampling and reporting from Member States. A baseline survey on Salmonella in pigs reared for human consumption will be published over the coming months. In the case of Salmonella in animal populations, baseline surveys will assist the European Commission in setting reduction targets.
The full report and annexes are available on the EFSA website.

Bron: www.efsa.europe.eu, nieuwsbericht 13 mei 2008 `index


4. PESTICIDE: New Zealand; Chemicals 200% above limit found in produce


Chemical residues up to 200 per cent above legal limits were found in fresh produce sampled for the Food Safety Authority.
The annual food residue surveillance programme tested unwashed capsicum, strawberries, lettuce, mushrooms and courgettes, from growers whom the authority will not name. Only the courgette samples were all within the maximum residue levels for fungicides, insecticides and other agricultural chemicals. In the other four categories, 10 of the 108 samples exceeded the legal limits by between 10 and 200 per cent.
Four of 36 strawberry samples were over the limit of 0.1mg of the fungicide cyprodinil per kilogram of fruit.

"I think that's too many. That's something we want to improve on," the authority's principal adviser on chemicals, Paul Dansted, said yesterday. But he said the survey was not random, instead targeting potential problem areas. And none of the breaches was enough to create any food-safety or health concerns.

Being 10 per cent over the limit was "marginal", although 200 per cent, in the case of permethrin on a fancy lettuce sample, was "relatively high". The growers involved were correcting their practices and he did not expect any would be prosecuted for the breaches. Permethrin was registered in New Zealand but not for use on fancy lettuces. "I think a grower might have made some assumptions that were not valid," Mr Dansted said.

One of the breaches - he refused to say which - was blamed on poor communication and language problems with harvesters of glasshouse produce which resulted in it being picked too soon after it had been sprayed.

The Pesticide Action Network's co-ordinator, scientist Dr Meriel Watts, said failing to prosecute rendered the food-safety system toothless. "It's pointless having maximum residue levels unless legal action is taken when there's a breach. There's no incentive for them to stick to the law if when they breach it nothing happens to them." Dr Watts said the breaches included chemicals that had been shown in animal trials to cause cancer or to be possible carcinogens.
Bron: www.nzherald.co.nz, nieuwsbericht 15 mei 2008 `index

5. EU RAPID ALERT SYSTEM : Meldingen voedingsmiddelen door/uit Nederland - Week 19


- metal wire fragments (23; 29 mm) in frozen chicken breasts from the Netherlands (notified by Ireland)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 17.0; Tot. = 22.1 / B1 = 1.8; Tot. = 2.0 / B1 = 3.9; Tot. = 4.3 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (Tot. = 13.9 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 19.2; Tot. = 22.2 / B1 = 10.6; Tot. = 15.2 / B1 = 1.3; Tot. = 11.8 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Neterlands)



Bron: EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) `index




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