Editie 53 passie voor kwaliteit



Dovnload 28.11 Kb.
Datum20.08.2016
Grootte28.11 Kb.




Editie 53

passie voor kwaliteit

21 augustus 2008





GLYCIDAMIDE: Molecule causing cancer in fish and crisps

Munich researchers proved the cancer-releasing Glycidamid in Pommes of frites and potato chip. Glycidamid is clearly more dangerous than years ago the acrylamide already discovered in potato products. An toxicologist warns because of the small concentrations however of fearmongering. Munich - in April 2002 a message of Swedish scientists alarmed consumers and food manufacturers. A multiplicity of food contains carcinogenic acrylamide (more...), among them potato chips, Pommes and Spekulatius. In the animal experiment acrylamide works actually carcinogenically, it changes the hereditary material. How dangerous the substance for humans is, scientists do not have yet finally clarified, in the meantime gave it even to 'all-clear' signal (more...). Pommes of frites: Carcinogenic Glycidamid discovers Now researchers of the technical University of Munich identified another, by far dangerous material in potato chips: Glycidamid. The team of Michael Granvogl had examined ten different sorts chips and three sorts of before-baked Pommes. All samples contained Glycidamid, write the researchers in the trade paper " Journal OF Agricultural and Food Chemistry". The concentration lay in the range 0.3 to 1.5 microgram per kilogram. These values appear first small. Thus acrylamide in the same products seems to microgram per kilogram typically in quantities from 300 to 600. But the scientists could not give 'all-clear' signal, because is considered to Glycidamid as substantially more dangerous. Munich the researchers referred Kaiserslautern, which had resulted in to a trade-off study of the university that Glycidamid can release mutations in mammalian cells even in smallest quantities. _ however give toxicologist and chemist Matthias tree of the technical University of Kaiserslautern already 'all-clear' signal: The substance is formed in the body in by far larger quantities, than it was proven in the meal. Acrylamide is reduced in the liver to Glycidamid - a process, which is according to tree mainly for the well-known carcinogenic effect of acrylamide responsible. It gives publications, which assumed that in the human body approximately ten per cent of the acrylamide were converted, said the toxicologist. Therefore a multiple of the quantity of Glycidamid, proven in the food, would develop in the liver. " From the belly said what the colleagues at Glycidamid found, would not be allowed to do a substantial contribution leisten" , Type says. Acrylamide Glycidamid carcinogenic materials Also the leader that Munich study, Granvogl, says, to lower it goes to it not around releasing a renewed panic as with the acrylamide but therefore that production processes were optimized, in order the load. He eat still Pommes Frites anyhow. That is valid also for tree: " I make myself thereby substantially more concerns around predominance than around Glycidamid" , the toxicologist said. Like acrylamide also Glycidamid develops when heating up potato products, thus frites occurs also in Pommes. The substance forms by a reaction of acrylamide with parts of the Frittierfettes and oxygen. Crucially for the quantity thereby also the kind of the fat is apart from the temperature. Straight one with that actually as healthy valid insatiated fatty acids developed particularly for much Glycidamid, explained the researchers. They recommend therefore Frittiertemperaturen under 180 degrees. In addition satisfied Frittierfette should be used such as Palmöl.
Bron: www.spiegel.de, nieuwsbericht 18 augustus 2008
Naar aanleiding van dit bericht op SpiegelOnline heeft ons zusterlaboratorium in Duitsland ons laten weten hiervoor een analyse hebben ontwikkeld. Wilt u meer informatie, neemt u dan contact op met onze afdeling Projectcoördinatie Food: per e-mail pc_food@eurofins.nl of telefonisch (088 - 8310000).


Hierbij ontvangt u de Eurofins Info Nieuwsbrief: een selectie uit het voedselveiligheids- en wetgevingsnieuws van de afgelopen week:




VOEDSELVEILIGHEID & -KWALITEIT

1. FOOD : EFSA adopts first opinions on health claims made on foods relating to disease risk reduction and children’s health

2. FOOD : EU plans labels on artificial colours

3. EU RAPID ALERT SYSTEM : Meldingen voedingsmiddelen door/uit Nederland - Week 33

Bij elke link in dit document kan de toetscombinatie CTRL-klik gebruikt worden om direct naar de artikelen te springen. Bij ingekorte artikelen kan op dezelfde wijze worden doorgeklikt naar de originele website.


VOEDSELVEILIGHEID & -KWALITEIT



1. FOOD : EFSA adopts first opinions on health claims made on foods relating to disease risk reduction and children’s health


EFSA’s Panel on dietetic products, nutrition and allergies (NDA) has adopted its first series of opinions on claims referring to the reduction of disease risk, and children's development and health[1]. Scientists of the NDA Panel examined the scientific evidence for 8 claims, 5 of which related to children’s health and 3 to disease risk reduction. The scientific opinions describe the outcome and conclusions of the Panel’s evaluation of the scientific substantiation of the proposed health claims submitted by the applicants. This scientific advice is provided to the European Commission and Member States who will proceed with the next steps for the possible authorisation of these health claims.
Prof Albert Flynn, chair of the EFSA NDA Panel, said: “EFSA’s independent evaluation of the health claims that companies want to make for their foods is important because consumers want to be able to trust the claims. All of the data provided to us in the dossiers submitted by the applicants to justify their claims have been evaluated according to uniform criteria. The Panel’s opinions reflect the quality of the evidence submitted and provide the scientific advice needed for the risk managers”.
The first series of adopted opinions reflects the variability of the submissions received. In some cases adequate evidence to support the application was available, while for others it was not. Claims on the reduction of risk of disease and children’s development and health require the evaluation of scientific data submitted by the applicant. EFSA published a guidance document for applicants on the submission of health claims in 2007[2]. The guidance aims to help companies submitting health claims and addresses the kind of information companies need to include in their application, in particular concerning the scientific data and evidence required to support claims.
EFSA’s role is to verify whether the health claim is substantiated by scientific evidence, delivering its opinion within 5 months of validating the applications received. Today’s opinions have been adopted and published within the deadline specified in the Regulation and are now available on EFSA’s website. EFSA’s advice is provided to the European Commission and Member States who will proceed with the next steps for the possible authorisation of these health claims.
At present, a further 220 such claims have been received by EFSA and will be evaluated once they have undergone a completeness check. The summaries of the claim dossiers are published on EFSA’s website once the application has been validated and is ready for the evaluation by the NDA Panel.
Bron: www.efsa.europa.eu, persbericht 21 augustus 2008 `index

2. FOOD : EU plans labels on artificial colours


Food and drinks containing any of six artificial colourings that may be linked to hyperactive behaviour in children will have to carry warnings, under a proposed EU deal. The requirement would apply to imports as well as those made in the EU.
Hundreds of products containing the colourings will disappear from shops over the next year following the Food Standards Agency's (FSA) call for a voluntary ban on their use in food products. The agency wants ministers to push for the colourings to be removed across Europe, believing a study from Southampton University showed a "direction of travel" between them and children's behaviour, despite the lack of evidence of a biological causal mechanism. EU safety advisers have begun a review of recommended daily intakes of additives.

The requirement for labelling, which would warn consumers that products "may have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children", emerged in negotiations between MEPs, the European commission and the council of ministers over a new structure for authorising additives, flavourings and enzymes in food. It has to be approved by ministers later in the year and firms will be given time to comply, probably until mid-2010.


Major manufacturers Such as Cadbury Trebor Basset, Nestlé UK and Unilever, as well as own-brand retailers such as Tesco, Asda and Marks & Spencer, say they either do not use the colourings or will have removed them by the end of the year, well in advance of Britain's voluntary ban, which starts at the end of 2009. Several big players began replacing them in response to consumer demand years ago, and some manufacturers of products for which new formulations were seen as technically difficult, including mushy peas, battenberg cake and turkish delight, have successfully made them without artificial colouring. Coca-Cola, whose most famous product has never contained any of the colourings involved, says it has been moving towards the use of non-artificial colours, flavours and preservatives for some years. The FSA believes it has much to do to ensure that small and medium-sized companies, including caterers and restaurants, adopt their ban, while it is unclear whether the EU labelling rules would apply to the catering industry. The E-numbers in question, tartrazine (E102), quinoline yellow (E104), sunset yellow (E110), carmoisine (E122), ponceau 4R (E124) and allura red (E129), already have to be listed on products; MEPs added the warning requirement after publication of the Southampton study and the FSA's action.
Anna Glayzer, coordinator of the Food Commission's Action on Additives campaign, said: "Why not simply ban these colours" ... We know they affect children and serve no useful purpose in our food."

The Food and Drink Federation said a voluntary ban was unnecessary, and questioned whether it was workable, as it did not apply to imports.

Bron: www.guardian.co.uk, nieuwsbericht 21 augustus 2008 `index


3. EU RAPID ALERT SYSTEM : Meldingen voedingsmiddelen door/uit Nederland - Week 33


- too high content of nitrate (3168 mg/kg - ppm) in fresh spinach from the Netherlands (notified by the Czech Republic)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 5.7; Tot. = 31.5 μg/kg - ppb) in rice crackers and peanut crackers from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 7.9; Tot. = 9.1 μg/kg - ppb) in blanched groundnut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 28.6; Tot. = 145.1 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 68.6; Tot. = 155.1 / B1 = 11.4; Tot. = 29.8 / B1 = 5.3; Tot. = 32.3 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 19.3; Tot. = 48 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 5.5 μg/kg - ppb) in peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 1.1; Tot. = 6.9 μg/kg - ppb) in groundnut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 31.2; Tot. = 34.6 / B1 = 25.6; Tot. = 60.7 μg/kg - ppb) in groundnut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 51.5; Tot. = 64.5 / B1 = 2.4; Tot. = 2.8 μg/kg - ppb) in groundnut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = N.D.; Tot. = N.D. / B1 = 7.8; Tot. = 42 / B1 = 1.6; Tot. = 10.7 μg/kg - ppb) in groundnut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = N.D.; Tot. = 0.2 / B1 = 2.0; Tot. = 11.2 / B1 = 5.8; Tot. = 6.4 μg/kg - ppb) in groundnut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = N.D.; Tot. = N.D. / B1 = 3.3; Tot. = 5.1 / B1 = 4.1; Tot. = 4.5 μg/kg - ppb) in runner groundnuts from Brazil (notified by the Nethelands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 3.6; Tot. = 7.8 / B1 = 1.8; Tot. = 3.4 / B1 = 4.2; Tot. = 4.9 μg/kg - ppb) in runner groundnuts from Brazil (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 4.2; Tot. = 5.4 / B1 = 0.6; Tot. = 0.7 μg/kg - ppb) in nori wasabi flavour coated peanuts from Thailand (notified by the Netherlands)

- aflatoxins (B1 = 6.2 μg/kg - ppb) in blanched peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)



- aflatoxins (Tot. = 1.0 / Tot. = 12.8 / Tot. = 0.3 μg/kg - ppb) in blanched peanut kernels from China (notified by the Netherlands)
Bron: EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) `index




© 2008 Eurofins Food BV Heerenveen 088-8310000



Eurofins Info – Eurofins Food pag. van




De database wordt beschermd door het auteursrecht ©opleid.info 2017
stuur bericht

    Hoofdpagina